Memory keeping is something that I have loved since I was a child. I spent hours pouring over my mom’s photo books, grandpa’s family tree book, and my own baby album.

Now that I am a mom I record more with words. I love to tell the stories of our family to our children. So, as we begun our US Geography tour I knew I was going to want a special way to record our “travels.”

How We Use Our Free 50 State Scrapbooking Pages

Sure we have their notebooking pages, but I was looking for a way to record the personal stuff. Their memories about what we did together, what they learned, and what they liked best. These US Geography scrapbooking pages are the perfect fit for us.

Our family has had so much fun filling these out! Here are a few of the ways we have done it.

Getting Started

  1. First get your pages at the end of each Eight for Each State US Geography post. We release a new scrapbooking page when each state is complete.
  2. Place them in page protectors in a three ring binder.
  3. After you “travel” to each state, record your memories!

Take Pictures

Take plenty of pictures of what you have done. After each major project, the girls are adamant that I take a picture of them with their project: bridge, salt marsh, food. Print your favorites either at home or at your local one-hour photo place. Try wallet size if you would like to add more than one.

If you have other pictures from that state — from travels, a visit, or maybe even because you live there — add those too.

I like to use double sided tape any time our project involves pictures. It makes a smoother flatter surface, and doesn’t make the paper bumpy like glue.

Draw Pictures

Ruth and Sarah Joan have just as much fun drawing pictures of their favorite parts of our US Geography tour as using the real ones. Ruth has drawn pictures of the project we made for Pennsylvania as well as the flag, flower, and tree of Connecticut.

How We Use Our Free 50 State Scrapbooking Pages Finished

Cut Pictures

When we travel, we like to stop at any state welcome center we can find. Usually they are very nice rest areas with plenty of travel information. My kids enjoy picking up a few brochures and books to look at on the way.

If you don’t have any travel brochures, try writing to the Tourism and Travel Departments of a few states. This link will connect you to the departments for almost every state in the union.

The Dewey family received quite the number of packages full of colorful information from various state governors and tourism boards. Click over — their project is not-to-be-missed.

Virginia had some of the nicest pictures! Ruth enjoyed paging through them to make her fabulous scrapbook page. It turned out so neat!

Make Word Pictures

The writing space on these pages can be used for so many things. Try switching up what types of things you record about your US Geography tour.

  • What did you like best about the state?
  • What was your favorite landmark?
  • What food did you make? Was it good?
  • What places in the state would you like to visit?
  • Tell about a state project you did.
  • Tell about one or two state symbols. What did you learn about them?
  • Tell about your favorite historical fact.
  • Get creative! Ruth even wrote a poem about how to make a colonial style lady’s pocket.
    • “Get a piece of fabric,
      Cut two pocket shapes,
      Cut a slot in one, and sew it up with grace,
      Now decorate the front,
      Now get a ribbon piece,
      Sew it up, have some fun,
      And wear it round your waist.”

How We Use Our Free 50 State Scrapbooking Pages Journaling

Enjoy your US Geography study. Have fun with it and be sure to find some way to remember it. I am sure that our US Scrapbook notebooks will be pulled from the shelf for years to come! Don’t forget to make one for yourself!

How are you using your US Geography Scrapbooking pages?

Jessica Lawton

Contributor at pambarnhill.com
Jessica Lawton is a homeschool mom to five fantastically fabulous children. Her hobbies include book collecting, knitting, reading, and birdwatching. While teacher or writer were never on her list of Things to Be When I Grow Up, she curiously finds herself doing both, and enjoying it. This only strengthens her firmly held belief that God has better plans for us than we have for ourselves.
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